Each Wednesday, The Wrap presents a compilation of recent noteworthy commercial real estate stories from a variety of publications. Below are links to five stories that caught our eyes in recent days:

Atlanta office sales volume to slow in 2017, By Jarred Schenke, Biznow

Key Excerpt:

“Atlanta just represented the tip of the iceberg of a second-tier U.S. city renaissance when it came to big, institutional real estate funds and foreign investment dollars. In Q4 2016 alone, half of all office building transactions in the U.S. happened in cities like Atlanta, Dallas, Philadelphia and other major metro hubs outside of major gateway cities like New York or Los Angeles, according to JLL. Towers in those cities also accounted for more than 35 percent of all office sales during 2016.”

High-dollar office deals highlight foreign capital’s hand in extending CRE market’s bull run, Costar

Key Excerpt:

“A series of transactions involving several high-profile properties in Manhattan and Boston over the last few days underscores the enormous and unmistakable role of foreign investors, particularly large government-sponsored funds, in generating a large part of the demand and liquidity that has extended the depth and duration of the unprecedented growth run for US commercial real estate.”

The ‘optimal distribution’ of US cities, Multifamily Executive

Key Excerpt:

“The study concludes that, in their current distribution, U.S. cities may be undersized by up to one-third, and that the nation may have up to twice as many cities as it needs. This conclusion is drawn based on the relationship between the costs and benefits of large and small cities, as well as the trade-off between individual and social benefits.”

Outlook for apartment sector looks strong, By Bendix Anderson, NREIOnline.com

Key Excerpt:

“Rents will continue to grow faster than inflation and the average percentage of occupied apartments will continue to be relatively healthy in 2017. Developers will open more apartments than they did last year, but not enough to push the supple demand balance to the breaking point. And the new class-A construction is still concentrated in “core” downtown markets, leaving suburban markets and class-B apartment buildings relatively free from competition.”

U.S. commercial markets well positioned for 2017, New York possible exception, By Michael Gerrity, World Property Journal

Key Excerpt:

“On the occupier side, the Q4 2016 RICS U.S. Commercial Property Monitor found a positive outlook for rents throughout the coming year, with the largest gains projected in the prime office and multifamily sectors – both near 3 percent – followed by secondary multifamily (2.3 percent) and prime industrial (2.0 percent).  Expectations for secondary office and secondary retail are a little more downbeat. But the development starts indicator continues showing a positive trend in the pipeline, led by the office sector. Meanwhile, investor demand increased across all sectors and inquiries from international investors also continued growing.”